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Legarda: Yakan Weavers To Showcase Their Craft at National Museum

November 7, 2014

Yakan weavers from Zamboanga will demonstrate how they weave natural fibers into colorful fabrics with intricate designs during a two-day demonstration at the National Museum, said Senator Loren Legarda.

 

Legarda, patron of the country’s first permanent textile gallery,Hibla ng Lahing Filipino, said that the Yakans are the featured craftsmen at the gallery on November 8-9, from 1:00-5:00 p.m.

 

“The Yakans traditionally wear colorful, handwoven garments. They are one of the most distinctively dressed groups of people in Mindanao. A closer look at their garments will reveal the intricate patterns they employ in weaving,” she said.

 

To be featured is the seputangan, a famous handwoven cloth of the Yakans containing intricate designs. It is usually worn as a head cover or around the waist.

 

“I invite Filipinos to see how our Yakan weavers combine their skill and love for their heritage to create beautifully woven fabrics. We can better appreciate our culture when we personally see how our culture bearers value traditions and strive to preserve their heritage,” said Legarda.

 

The weekly weaving demonstrations at the Hibla gallery are part of the Lecture Series on Philippine Traditional Textiles and Indigenous Knowledge, which Legarda initiated since 2012 to perpetuate weaving and indigenous knowledge.

 

Previous demonstrators from the Cordillera Region were the Ifugao weavers from Kiangan, the Kalinga weavers from Mabilong Weaving Center of Buscalan and weavers from Samoki, Mountain Province.

 

Weavers from Panay Island also showcased their craft. Weavers from Arevalo, Iloilo demonstrated sinamay weaving, the Panay Bukidnons showcased their panubok embroidery, and weavers from Bagtason Loom Weavers Association in Bugasong, Antique showed how they make the colorful patadyong.

 

The weaving demonstrations can be viewed from 1:00-5:00 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays, at the Hibla gallery, located at the 4th Floor of the Museum of the Filipino People, Finance Road, Manila.